PT Food Co-op

Port Townsend Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., Port Townsend, WA, 98368
Open Every Day 8am-9pm
Phone: (360) 385-2883

Archive for the ‘Co-op History’ Category

Annual Report 2012

May 28th, 2013 by Kathie

AR2013_coverIn 2012, we experienced growth, gave back to the community, and celebrated our 40th anniversary. Click the image on the left to read the full report. Thank you for shopping at the Food Co-op and contributing to our success!

Annual Meeting 2013

April 15th, 2013 by Kathie

AM

Co-op Bean Program Wins National Award

January 22nd, 2013 by Kathie

Bean Jar smallWe are pleased to announce that the Port Townsend Food Co-op won the small store retailer, Neighborhood Health Improvement category in the 2012 Food Marketing Institute Community Outreach Awards for our Beans for Bags Program. For this, we will receive a plaque as well as $1,000. The money will be used for more outreach into our community.

It just goes to show that something as small as a bean or a nickel can make a big difference.

“Every bean is equal to one and two-thirds pounds of food from Food Life Line, where we order our food from,” said Shirley Moss, the Jefferson County Food Bank manager. “If we didn’t have the contribution from the Food Co-op it would be very difficult to provide for all of these people. We served 325 families [on the] Wednesday after Thanksgiving. That’s a massive amount for us on a normal day.”

Every year, our food co-op gives over $27,000 to Jefferson County organizations in charitable contributions which includes Beans for Bags donations. In 2012, the Bean donation total topped $8,000 – a new record! In the last five years, the Food Co-op has given back a total of $37,845.19 to the community through this program.

The Food Co-op has never given out plastic bags and has always encouraged member/owners to bring their own bags as well as their own containers for produce and bulk food. In 2008, we began the Beans for Bags Program in which we gave our member/owners the choice of receiving either a nickel refund for each container or bag they bring for their groceries, or a bean worth five cents which they can drop in their choice of glass gallon jars designated for three local non-profit organizations. One of those three non-profit organizations is always the county food bank. The other two choices come from nominations made by the member/owners themselves. Those organizations typically serve local schools including Head Start, the local NAMI chapter, the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program, the homeless shelter, the animal shelter, the public library, the local hospice, a free clinic, United Good Neighbors, local farmer support, Habitat for Humanity, and an abused women’s shelter, among others.

We thank our Co-op shoppers for their generosity and strong support of the Beans for Bags Program.

 

Strategic Plan for 2013-2017

January 10th, 2013 by Kathie

Strategic Plan double truck new endsAt the December 2012 board meeting, a five-year strategic plan was unanimously adopted to set the direction for the Food Co-op’s future.

“A strategic plan is an opportunity to look towards the future that you want to create and then assess where you are currently, then look to align efforts and resources,” said Sam Gibboney, board president. “It’s that budgeting of effort and resources that the strategic plan helps an organization to make the daily choices that we have. Any organization, any person, particularly in this day and age, is faced with a multitude of decisions every day where they can put their attention, put their time, put their money, and the Co-op is no different.”

The full document is now available online at: Food Co-op Five-Year Strategic Plan: 2013-2017.

Bean program sets record!

January 10th, 2013 by Kathie

GraphicSummary12CompleteWebIt’s “bean” our best year yet!

In 2012, the Food Co-op Beans for Bags program topped the $8K mark, a new record. The total donated this year was $8,056.80.

Since its inception in 2008, the program has given Co-op member/owners the choice of receiving either a nickel refund for each container or bag they bring for their groceries, or a bean worth five cents which they can drop in their choice of glass gallon jars designated for three local non-profit organizations.

One of those three non-profit organizations is always the county food bank. The other two choices come from nominations made by the member/owners themselves. Those organizations typically serve local schools including Head Start. Other organizations served have been the local NAMI chapter, homeless shelter, animal shelter, public library, hospice, a free clinic, United Good Neighbors, local farmer support, Habitat for Humanity, and an abused women’s shelter, among others.

In the last five years, the Food Co-op has given back a total of $37,845.19 to the community through this program. We thank our Co-op shoppers for their generosity this year and every year.

Dining Area Addition Progresses

October 9th, 2012 by Kathie

As construction progresses each day, we get more and more excited for our store’s dining area expansion! It promises to be filled with sunlight and laughter, and additional seating will help accommodate all who enjoy the Food Co-op as a place to gather with friends and neighbors.

Little & Little Construction crew discuss the progress of the new dining area addition at the Food Co-op.

During the week of Oct. 15, we will see these tangible changes:

  • Erection of a temporary wall in the current dining area
  • Re-use of the windows from the current dining area into the new space
  • New door added
  • Electrical work finished

When the new area is complete, door access to the outside courtyard area will be closed except for emergencies and will have an alarm if opened unexpectedly. From then on, our members and staff can go through the south entrance main doors to enjoy eating their Co-op meals al fresco.

Project completion is scheduled for Nov. 15. A local company, Little & Little Construction, is the contractor.

Co-op Stories: Marly & Robert Yourish

May 21st, 2012 by foodcoop

We joined the Food Coop in 1974 at its first storefront location, where Pane d’Amore Bakery is currently located. It was often self-service back then, from opening up (the key was next door at the gas station, currently Badd Habit), to measuring bulk foods, to ringing up your own sale and making your own change.

Nobody delivered whole foods to Port Townsend back then, so we went to Seattle every week or two, with a succession of vans or bread trucks. There was no traffic in Seattle then and we could make fifteen or more stops in one day, all over the city. We stopped at the Little Bread Company, Seattle’s first modern day worker cooperative. We shopped at C.C. Grains, a worker cooperative run by militantly feminist women on forklifts. The guys would usually wait in the van. We bought produce from Community Produce, down below Pike Place Market. We would return to the Co-op late at night, usually in the rain, to unload the van and put away all the food.

My Co-op Story: Beth Kreihbel

May 13th, 2012 by foodcoop

I joined the Co-op when I arrived in Port Townsend in the fall of 1984, back when it was located uptown. I did volunteer cashiering at the Co-op and earned discounts on my purchases. That store was small and the produce shelves needed constant restocking because they held so little.

The Food Co-op and gardening have been constants in my ever-changing life in Port Townsend. I began growing a lot of my own produce when I moved here. I had lived in Michigan and Montana prior to Washington State and was thrilled to learn that I could grow food year-round in Port Townsend. I’ve had a garden ever since.

At the Co-op I’ve always appreciated that I can get healthier products that can’t be found elsewhere: foods, herbs, supplements, even make-up! At one point there was an adjacent shopping space in the uptown location where the Co-op sold a variety of household goods and I still have some cotton throw rugs I purchased there.

When I was co-owner of the Village Baker, the Co-op was the retail outlet that sold the largest quantity of our bread. To say I’m grateful for all the positive influences the Co-op has had on my life is an understatement, nevertheless, thank you Port Townsend Food Co-op!

My Co-op Story: Kisler’s Finnriver Farm

May 2nd, 2012 by foodcoop

Keith and Crystie Kisler: Owners since 1997

When Keith and I first explored Port Townsend in the mid-90s, we knew we needed to find a town with a good Co-op.  We also knew we wanted to find a farm and live a life growing on the land. The Food Co-op uptown was where we met many of our first friends, as well as where we fed ourselves.

As the Co-op grew and the community of conscientious food eaters supported the expansion to the new location, we gained hope that our farm dream may become possible as well. Once we found land and leaped out onto on the small farm limb, we counted on the Co-op to be a business partner. From the first, we felt welcomed and encouraged by the Co-op. And then, when we began to ferment hard cider, we felt confident that at least one store, somewhere in the world, would carry our new products.

Indeed the Co-op was the first market to put us on their shelves! The Co-op has offered community, confidence and camaraderie in our ongoing quest to become a viable small farm enterprise. Last season, we hosted the Co-op Apple Festival and enjoyed celebrating vibrant food community and the autumn harvest with all the fine folks who came out. Our thanks go to the whole team at the Co-op who all provide a lovely place for us to shop, a friendly place for us to encounter our friends, and a fruitful place for us to sell our goods!

My Co-op Story: Beth Johnson /InSeason Catering

April 13th, 2012 by foodcoop

Beth Johnson

I moved to Port Townsend in 1988 and began volunteering at Port Townsend Food Co-op. The Co-op provided easy access to community and good food, two very important parts of my life!

Over the years I volunteered and then joined the paid employees when the shift from volunteers to paid staff occurred. Originally I volunteered wherever needed, but soon gravitated to the produce department, where setting up displays and keeping the vegetables and fruits happy kept me happy. As life got busier I gave up working at the Food Co-op but kept the feeling of it being “my co-op” or “our co-op.”

When I began my own business as In Season Catering in 2004, I began to appreciate how much support the Food Co-op gives local small businesses. I have been grateful for the chance to wholesale my products and vend my products in the store during the summers.

Living in Port Townsend without our co-op would make both my personal and business life seriously deprived! Happy 40th!

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