PT Food Co-op

Port Townsend Food Co-op, 414 Kearney St., Port Townsend, WA, 98368
Open Every Day 8am-9pm
Phone: (360) 385-2883

Archive for the ‘Community Involvement’ Category

Co-op Bean Program Wins National Award

January 22nd, 2013 by Kathie

Bean Jar smallWe are pleased to announce that the Port Townsend Food Co-op won the small store retailer, Neighborhood Health Improvement category in the 2012 Food Marketing Institute Community Outreach Awards for our Beans for Bags Program. For this, we will receive a plaque as well as $1,000. The money will be used for more outreach into our community.

It just goes to show that something as small as a bean or a nickel can make a big difference.

“Every bean is equal to one and two-thirds pounds of food from Food Life Line, where we order our food from,” said Shirley Moss, the Jefferson County Food Bank manager. “If we didn’t have the contribution from the Food Co-op it would be very difficult to provide for all of these people. We served 325 families [on the] Wednesday after Thanksgiving. That’s a massive amount for us on a normal day.”

Every year, our food co-op gives over $27,000 to Jefferson County organizations in charitable contributions which includes Beans for Bags donations. In 2012, the Bean donation total topped $8,000 – a new record! In the last five years, the Food Co-op has given back a total of $37,845.19 to the community through this program.

The Food Co-op has never given out plastic bags and has always encouraged member/owners to bring their own bags as well as their own containers for produce and bulk food. In 2008, we began the Beans for Bags Program in which we gave our member/owners the choice of receiving either a nickel refund for each container or bag they bring for their groceries, or a bean worth five cents which they can drop in their choice of glass gallon jars designated for three local non-profit organizations. One of those three non-profit organizations is always the county food bank. The other two choices come from nominations made by the member/owners themselves. Those organizations typically serve local schools including Head Start, the local NAMI chapter, the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program, the homeless shelter, the animal shelter, the public library, the local hospice, a free clinic, United Good Neighbors, local farmer support, Habitat for Humanity, and an abused women’s shelter, among others.

We thank our Co-op shoppers for their generosity and strong support of the Beans for Bags Program.

 

Living Without Plastic – Could You?

November 1st, 2012 by Kathie

Beth Terry didn’t just give up plastic bags. She has attempted to give up all plastic. For the past five years, since 2007, Terry has strived to bring absolutely no new plastic into her life. She comes to Port Townsend at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18 to speak of her experience at the Cotton Building at 607 Water St. The event is free.

“Bringing Beth Terry to town seems like a natural thing to do considering that the city’s plastic bag ban went into effect this month,” said Kathie Meyer, outreach coordinator for the Port Townsend Food Co-op. “And she has graciously waived her speaking fee to come here.”

It was one day, while laid up from surgery, that Terry became personally affected by a photo of a baby albatross carcass, dead from being fed plastic bits by its mother.  It was then she decided, if something were to be done about the effects of plastic on the global environment, she had to start with herself.

Since her “plastic awakening,” Terry went from personally generating almost four pounds of plastic waste per month (yes, she weighed it) to a little over two pounds per year. The average American, she says, generates between 88 and 120 pounds per year.

To keep herself on track, Terry started a blog (www.myplasticfreelife.com) which grew into a book titled Plastic Free: How I Kicked the Plastic Habit and How You Can Too. Her book combines useful information about plastic-free alternatives with personal stories and the occasional rant.

“I didn’t write this book to tell anyone what to do, but as an invitation to join me in this journey of personal and ecological discovery. Sure, in all honesty I do want to inspire you and your friends and family to use less plastic. But more than that, to learn what it is about plastic that makes it the symbol of what Captain Charles Moore (discoverer of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch) calls the ‘crisis of our civilization,’ and figure out ways to get out from under the thumb of plastic addiction,” Terry writes in her book’s introduction.

Terry walks her talk in every area of her life. She made sure that her book was as plastic-free as possible too.  “Most books are full of plastic,” she writes. “So we’ve stripped things down. The jacket is uncoated, the thread is made of cotton, and the boards and spine are exposed. Our printer even managed to find a plastic-free glue to use. With all that in mind, we assure you that if the book’s not 100% free of plastic, it’s as close as can be!”

Beth Terry’s book is for sale and signing at her presentation. Her appearance is presented with the cooperation and sponsorship of the City of Port Townsend, Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce, Main Street Program, Old Consulate Inn, Port Townsend Food Co-op, Port Townsend Public Library, and Jude Rubin, aka the “Plastic Bag Monster.”

For more information, call 385-2831, ext. 309.

Local Mystery Bay Chevre Wins Second Best in North America!

August 12th, 2012 by Lauren

 

This week marks an incredible moment for Mystery Bay Farm, winner of the silver medal in the American Cheese Society’s 2012 North American Best Cheese Competition.

If you have not tasted this ultra creamy, mild and delicious chevre you must! Considering that there are thousands of chevre producers in North America, Rachael’s cheese shines in the spotlight.

Not only is taste and consistency why this cheese is preferred, the ecological methodology of Mystery Bay’s farming practices makes all of her products superb.

The cheese case at the Co-op has been rearranged to host Mystery Bay’s products at the bottom level in the center. Come and check out the four flavors of fresh chevre (made every week) and the exquisite chevre in basil infused olive oil.

Further Reading and Mystery Bay in the Press

How Does Your Grocery Store Check Out?

August 8th, 2012 by foodcoop

To read the full report, click here.

Jefferson County Fair: Food Co-op Booth

August 5th, 2012 by foodcoop

Don’t miss the 75th anniversary of the JeffCo Fair on August 10-12! While you’re wandering through… looking at the cats, pigs, zucchini, quilts and photos entered to win, check out the Food Co-op booth. Stop by on Saturday at 2pm for a piece of cake to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Co-op, and the 75th for the fair. Play pin the tail on Quimper the dog to win prizes. Guess the number of dog biscuits in the jar and win something else! Free samples.

See you at the Fair! For more info about the fair, click here.

 

40th Anniversary Party… Getting Closer!

August 2nd, 2012 by foodcoop

Our 40th Anniversary celebration party is Sunday, August 19th from 2:40 – 6:40 pm at the Northwest Maritime Center. For details about the party, click here. 50 reserved parking passes available now at the Member Services Desk for Co-op owners, first come, first served. The reserved parking is located in the back of the Hudson Point boatyard. Look for signage and parking attendant. Display parking pass on dashboard of car.

The long-range forcast for the weather is 74 degrees! Dancing on the Compass Rose, tasty bites of local treats, bring a beach chair and/or blankets and enjoy fun in the sun!

Special VIP room upstairs for Co-op owners. Join today and become a VIP at the party!

 

Local Raw Sheep Cheese Arrives at the Co-op!

July 22nd, 2012 by Lauren

Some of you may know that finding a good raw sheep’s milk cheese is difficult- if we are looking domestically in the U.S.. Spain has a long history of raising mountain sheep and creating beautiful cheeses, and this is where we usually go to look for Manchego, Idiazabal, Petit Basque and others. So when we found the Black Sheep Creamery in Adna, Washington, we were delighted to find many different types of raw aged sheep’s milk cheese! Not only is the farm a small family run business, but the cheese is unbelieveable.

Last week we received a wheel of the Fresh Pecorino, aged only 6 months, this cheese is robust in flavor with a silky smooth texture. Aged Pecorino’s have a strong sharp bite that makes it ideal for cooking pastas, pestos, etc. The Fresh Pecorino cheese can be eated raw with fresh fruits or grated and used the same way as an aged cheese.  Somewhat sweet, somewhat salty, if you love sheep cheese you must try.

This week we will try another raw sheep called Mopsy’s Best. Come to the cheese department for a sample and help support our amazing local farmers in Washington State!

 

 

 

June “Beans” = $672!

July 15th, 2012 by foodcoop

Thanks to those who brought in reusable bags and containers and turned them into Beans in June. $672.00 was raised for three community organizations. $191.60 went to the Port Townsend Library Foundation; $330.85 went to local food banks; and $149.55 went to Sunfield School Community Programs.

Vegetable by Vegetable

July 5th, 2012 by Cindy

by Marko Colby & Hanako Myers

Have you seen the new book by our local Midori farmers? A must have reference book for our area with Hanako’s simply elegant drawings sprinkled throughout. From starting seed to culinary herbs, soil fertility and floating row covers, and more. There is a lot of information written for our growing conditions. Check it out!

New Recumbent Trike Parking at Co-op

June 20th, 2012 by foodcoop

Recumbent Trike Parking:  In response to member requests we have adjusted our green bike rack along the south side of our store to accommodate parking of larger bikes. A sign is posted that identifies that a 4 foot wide bike parking slot is reserved for such trikes. Happy and safe biking!

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